Saturday, March 16, 2019

Hina Matsuri at Shimogamo Shrine

Shimogamo Shrine is recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is one of the two most important and oldest shrines in Kyoto, predating the city of Kyoto's establishment as the national capital in 794.  It is located at the junction of the Takano and Kamo rivers and is surounded by Tadau no Mori, a forest containing trees that are up to 600 years old. 


On March 3rd each year, the Nagashibina Festival is held at Shimogamo Shrine.  For this celebration, a man and a woman dressed in old court style regalia, like the hina dolls, take paper dolls in specially woven reed baskets and place them into the sacred stream flowing through the Shimogamo grounds.








































Even though it was rainy and very crowded, I am very glad I was able to be there and witness some of the history and culture of Japan.


10 comments:

Sheryl said...

Hi Pamela i love you sharing the Japanese traditions and wonderful places to see,so glad that you got to see this one,hope you have a wonderful day my friend xx

Vireya said...

Wow! You do get to see some fascinating cultural events in Japan. And the beautiful traditional sites where they occur.

Mia said...

I am always thankful for your beautiful photos, Pamela. Kisses!

Ann said...

Thank you for sharing. I learn so much from your blog.

roughterrain crane said...

Thank you for sharing photos of this shrine. I have not visited here.I have heard that nagashibina is a very old custom, derived from an ancient Chinese custom of believing water's sacred power.

Julie said...

A lot of people taking part. The school children all looked so smartly dressed.

kiwikid said...

Womderful, it sure was busy there, thank you for sharing.

Leonore Winterer said...

Japan has such interesting traditions!

Beatrice said...

Hello Pamela,
I went there last year for the Hina Matsuri too! But it didn't rain.
Someone filmed the ceremony last year and I found it here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qd7dDjhBSV8

Many of my own photos are very similar to yours: the crowds taking pictures, for example!
I remember the empress and the emperor, the choir and also, after the ceremony, all the children dropping their little floating wreaths in the river. Great memories!

Jeanie said...

That's a lot of people. Were you visiting on a weekend or during vacation time? It certainly is beautiful. We visited a number of shrines on Japan but not this one.